Author Archives: Rosie Campbell

Intertidal Mammal

By: Aaron, Peter, Rosie— The majority of our day was devoted to working on our projects which meant our brains were going at full racing speed. Aaron noted, “You could see smoke coming out of our heads.” Once we made some progress crunching numbers and writing up our methodology, we headed over to the Friday Harbor Labs to observe a scientific dive with our friend and marine life expert, Tim Dwyer, where we were able to watch the dive on a screen up on the dock and he was able to communicate with us what he was seeing. It was like we were having the underwater experience but still staying … Continue reading

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Hawaii in the San Juans

By: Aaron, Peter, Rosie— For one of the first times in hundreds of years a traditional Hawaiian vessel shared the waterways of the San Juans with a traditional Coast Salish vessel. Our day began with the lavender festival, an annual celebration hosted by Pelindaba Lavender Farm.  We ate and tried all things imaginable that were infused with lavender including coffee, ice cream, lotions and teas.   Afterwards we raced back to the labs to collect our tethered snails before the tide could rise and hide our specimens. We got there just in time to get the data we needed.  Lead by Matt Wickey, canoe builder and cultural expert, we set … Continue reading

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Spines for a change

By: Peter, Rosie, Aaron— Harbor seal pups gain 11 kilograms (24 lbs) in the first 5 weeks of their life, if everything goes according to plan.  However harbor seals in the Salish Sea are at their environmental carrying capacity, meaning that the population is the maximum that can be supported by the ecosystem.  This is, unfortunately, indicated by the number of seal pups that are found stranded or dead each year due to food shortages. We began our morning at Friday Harbor Laboratories, where the necropsy of a seal pup was being conducted.  Lead by Dr. Joe Gaydos, author of our Salish Sea guidebook, Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific … Continue reading

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Turning tide pools

By: Peter, Rosie, Aaron— How does the intertidal life differ between areas with more and less sun?   This is the question that we set out to answer with Dr. Hilary Hayford, another specialist from Friday Harbor Laboratories.  Out in Andrews Bay, on the northwestern portion of the island we gathered data in an observational study; a study where we surveyed a the amount of preexisting life along different levels in the intertidal zone.  We calculated the percentage of the surface rock that attached animals and algae covered on two separate sites and then returned to Spring Street to input and analyze our findings. After a well deserved lunch siesta … Continue reading

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How do barnacles like their lemonade?

By: Peter, Aaron, Rosie– On the rocks! Today we got to do actual scientific research with the help of Will King, a grad student at University of Washington. We conducted an observational study of how barnacle size correlates to its position in the intertidal zone. We learned that the optimal position for barnacles is to be high enough away from predators but also close enough to the water to obtain food. We observed that the larger barnacles were located at a middle point and they got smaller as elevation increased and decreased.   After lunch, we had the pleasure of rummaging through old treasures at the local thrift store to … Continue reading

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No Backbone, No Problem: I’m an Invertebrate

By: Rosie, Aaron, Peter — Meeting with renowned photographer Susan Middleton, invertebrate specialist Dr. Bernadette Holthius, and scientific illustrator Sharon Massey brought us with a flurry of colors and textures into the world of the spineless. After the first full night of sleep in a week, we ventured over to Friday Harbor Laboratories, and met with Spring Street International School science teacher and local naturalist, Sharon Massey who tutored us in scientific illustration.  When trying to draw the invertebrates that we captured on The Centennial on Monday, many of us struggled with our limited artistic abilities.  However, our scientific drive motivated us to continue.  Many students were surprised by how … Continue reading

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Longboat Day 5: Bringing it Home

By: Sonja, Ben, Parker— At the disagreeable hour of 5:30 in the morning, our alarms went off and we reluctantly opened our groggy eyes. The day had finally arrived. It was time to begin our journey back to the marina, where our adventure had begun five days before. After packing the rest of our supplies, we were on our way for the last time. Before we got going, Captain Sonia and Chrissy gave up a list of challenges to complete before reaching the marina. These challenges included: compiling a comprehensive list of all the marine life we had seen, doing a 360 degree turn in the boat, setting and furling … Continue reading

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Longboat Day 4: A Windy Sail to Saddlebag

By: Peter, Aaron, Rosie— In the morning of the fourth day, the boys awoke from a long and troubled night of wind and boat rocking.  The flapping boat cover had prevented sleep for all but the most drowsy of them.  Upon removal of the boat cover it was revealed to be a cloudy and windy day.  As the girls arrived from the tent site it was apparent that they had slept much better. We all got together on the beach at 6:00.  It was soon apparent that everyone was freezing.  After slowly loading the longboat it was suggested that we get on our bright neon orange exposure suits. We looked … Continue reading

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Longboat Day 3: Adventure at Cypress Head

By:Peter, Aaron, Rosie— The third day of our longboat voyage awoke at the luxuriously late hour of 8:00.  The day had been set aside with the initial plan to explore the beautiful Cypress Island, a much needed rest day.  Breakfast was similarly extravagant with fried potatoes, scrambled eggs and apple juice. We set out from our camp at Cypress Head, a peninsula shaped campground that nearly becomes an island during high tide, on the Cypress Head Trail.  A small group split off to return with Captain Soso to watch over the boat.  The remainder of us continued to the Old Airfield Trail which wandered through a former airstrip that is … Continue reading

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